Legendary writers and their typewriters.

Posted: 16/04/2013 in Tools
Tags: , , , , , ,

Ernest Miller Hemingway (July 21, 1899 – July 2, 1961)
Royal Quiet DeLuxe Portable of 1941.

20130416-150608.jpg
This was the first model in a series of the Royal Quiet DeLuxe line that outsold any other portables of the time. It was introduced just before World War II, but its production was suspended when Royal Typewriter Company, like other typewriter manufacturers in the United States at the time, was converted to an ordnance factory to produce weapons. When production resumed in 1946, the Royal Quiet DeLuxe continued to gain a following among on-the-go writers and journalists.

Underwood Noiseless Portable

20130416-231116.jpg

Sylvia Plath (October 27, 1932 – February 11, 1963)
Typewriter: Olivetti Lettera 22.

20130416-153107.jpg
The Olivetti Lettera 22 is a portable mechanical typewriter designed by Marcello Nizzoli in 1949 or, according to the company’s current owner Telecom Italia, 1950. This typewriter was very popular in Italy, and it still has many fans. It was awarded the Compasso d’oro prize in 1954. In 1959 the Illinois Institute of Technology chose the Lettera 22 as the best design product of the last 100 years.

Hunter Stockton Thompson (July 18, 1937 – February 20, 2005)
Typewriter: IBM Selectric.

20130416-155455.jpg
The Selectric typewriter was introduced on 23 July 1961. Its industrial design is credited to influential American designer Eliot Noyes. Noyes had worked on a number of design projects for IBM; prior to his work on the Selectric, he had been commissioned in 1956 by Thomas J. Watson, Jr. to create IBM’s first house style: these influential efforts, in which Noyes collaborated with Paul Rand, Marcel Breuer, and Charles Eames, have been referred to as the first “house style” program in American business.

James Mercer Langston Hughes (February 1, 1902 – May 22, 1967)
Typewriter: Remington Portable #1.

20130416-160552.jpg
Remingtons are a family line as long and as well-known among typewriter enthusiasts as they are among gun collectors. They literally began the typewriter revolution by contracting to produce the Sholes and Gliddon; later, they gave birth to the modern portable. When Remington began producing their own line of typewriters, their machines established themselves as virtual industry standards, unrivaled in popularity until the Underwood locomotive roared onto the scene. (Ironically, Underwood itself would later bow to Remington and license the company to produce Underwood’s Noiseless models at the Remington factory.) Remington bought the Noiseless typeriter company in 1924, generating a popular line of portables and desktop models.

Henry Charles Bukowski (born Heinrich Karl Bukowski; August 16, 1920 – March 9, 1994)
Typewriter: Royal HH.

20130416-231601.jpg

Dame Agatha Mary Clarissa Christie, (15 September 1890 – 12 January 1976)
Typewriter: Remington Vitor T.

20130416-232605.jpg

Carson McCullers (February 19, 1917 – September 29, 1967)
Typewriter: Underwood Standard Portable.

20130416-233740.jpg

Ian Lancaster Fleming (28 May 1908 – 12 August 1964)
Triumph Gabrielle.

20130416-234058.jpg

Thomas Lanier “Tennessee” Williams III (March 26, 1911 – February 25, 1983)
Typewriter: Corona Sterling.

20130416-235027.jpg

Julio Cortázar August 26, 1914 – February 12, 1984)
Typewriter: Olympia traveller de luxe.

20130417-000610.jpg

Douglas Noel Adams (11 March 1952 – 11 May 2001)
Typewriter: Hermes 8.

20130417-000929.jpg

Advertisements
Comments
  1. Freya Bromley says:

    I have recently written an article on whether Sylvia Plath was feminist or not.
    Please read it and let me know what you think, I hope my writing is a thoughtful and eloquent as yours.
    Freya Bromley

    http://pigeonsandpolitics.wordpress.com/2013/04/19/was-sylvia-plath-a-feminist/

  2. Dennis S. DuBay II says:

    Reblogged this on General musings while abusing my mind. and commented:
    Really cool post to go with the last piece of poetry I wrote.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s