Archive for the ‘Cars’ Category

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Love it ❤️.

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Two Vespa’s! Too cute!

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The best Vespa’s ever. Get inspired, always in vintage style. #vintage #industrial #vespa

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I’ve joint my target ….

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Rockin vespa.

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Black Vintage Vespa.

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Love the colors.

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It’s almost scooter time!

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Lego & Vespa. Vintage Combination.

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Dear Old Vespa #Retro Life.

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The best Vespa’s ever. Get inspired, always in vintage style. #vintage #industrial #vespa.

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Vespa Vintage 50 CC One of the symbols of Made in Italy. The first two-wheel scooter ever made, featuring the steel monocoque chassis, christened by Enrico Piaggio “Vespa” for its rounded shape.

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Apart from the very very nice vespa (n helmet) really really nice shoes. ❤️

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Vintage Vespa and Lambretta scooters in fab shades.

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From another view..

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Wow what a classic color for a #vespa #vespacolor

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Vespa 1967 Candy Apple Red VLB.

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Fiat 600 multipla jolly del 1961.

What is your favorite color?

Posted: 23/04/2014 in Cars
Tags: , , ,

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1958 Panama Yellow Corvette.

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This corvette has been fully restored by Jeff Lilly restorations.

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In 1922, Ferdinando Innocenti of Pescia built a steel-tubing factory in Rome. In 1931, he took the business to Milan where he built a larger factory producing seamless steel tubing and employing about 6,000. The factory was heavily bombed and destroyed during World War II. It is said that surveying the ruins, Innocenti saw the future of cheap, private transport and decided to produce a motor scooter, competing on cost and weather protection against the ubiquitous motorcycle.

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The main stimulus for the design style of the Lambretta and Vespa dates back to pre-World War II Cushman scooters made in Nebraska, United States. These olive green scooters were in Italy in large numbers, ordered originally by the United States military as field transport for the paratroops and marines. The United States military had used them to get around German defence tactics of destroying roads and bridges in the Dolomites (a section of the Alps) and the Austrian border areas.
Aeronautical engineer General Corradino D’Ascanio, responsible for the design and construction of the first modern helicopter by Agusta, was given the job by Ferdinando Innocenti of designing a simple, robust and affordable vehicle. It had to be easy to drive for both men and women, be able to carry a passenger and not get its driver’s clothes soiled.

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D’Ascanio, who hated motorbikes, designed a revolutionary vehicle. It was built on a spar frame with a handlebar gear change and the engine mounted directly onto the rear wheel. The front protection “shield” kept the rider dry and clean in comparison to the open front end on motorcycles. The pass-through leg area design was geared towards women, as wearing dresses or skirts made riding conventional motorcycles a challenge. The front fork, like an aircraft’s landing gear, allowed for easy wheel changing. The internal mesh transmission eliminated the standard motorcycle chain, a source of oil and dirt. This basic design allowed a series of features to be deployed on the frame which would later allow quick development of new models.
However, General D’Ascanio fell out with Innocenti, who rather than a stamped spar frame wanted to produce his frame from rolled tubing, allowing him to revive both parts of his prewar company. General D’Ascanio disassociated himself from Innocenti and took his design to Enrico Piaggio who produced the spar-framed Vespa from 1946 on. The final design of the Lambretta was done by aeronautical engineers Cesare Pallavicino and Pier Luigi Torre. Pallavicino had been Technical Director at the Caproni airplane factory during World War II before working on the Lambretta design. Torre was an engine designer at Italo Balbo’s Idros; he designed the engine and organized Innocenti’s factory for mass production.

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1967 Volkswagen type 2 deluxe.

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Home on wheels!!

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A vintage BMW Isetta with his little caravan.

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So cute!!

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One of the smallest convertible cars ever produced is the 1957 Messerschmitt KR 201 Roadster. Built by the aircraft manufacturer of the same name, in the frugal era of post-war Europe, this little gem, which boasts 87 mpg, in its heyday broke all speed records of its class in every trial.

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Unlike most Messerschmitts that came before it, this KR 201 Roadster shed its plexiglass cockpit bubble for something a bit sportier– a convertible top. It and the other Roadster-class details made a car so cartoonish in nature appear surprisingly elegant. The polished chrome, the candy red paint and the snakeskin interior make this little leopard a luxurious ride.

The KR 201 version of the popular KR 200 class is possibly the most rare Messerschmitt bubble car one could find. This model has been faithfully restored to an outstanding level of quality, poised to fetch between $60,000 and $70,000 at auction this weekend. It may be one of the tiniest convertible cars ever produced, but it’ll be one of the big stories at the Bruce Weiner Microcar Auction.

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Markus Haub transforms vintage racing pictures into the coolest car art we’ve seen all year. Artist and former car designer Markus Haub has been busy for the last years making “Racing Legends”. He takes his photos, tweaks them digitally, and then starts going wild with the prints.

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He scratches, renders and paints on his pictures in a kind of Pop Art collage, not feeling very restricted in what he can or can’t put on it. We end up with blocks of color over a 275 GTB, blotches and scratches over a Miura, and drips and text spilling across a Porsche 906.

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There are over 200 pieces in “Racing Legends” and they’ve been seen in Spain, Germany, France and New York. Last year the inimitable Cite de l’ Automobile, Musee National de France- Collection Schlumpf in Mulhouse, France, the world’s biggest car museum showed some of his series. Now you can find and buy his work at his new website speedstar-gallery.com

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It’s so refreshing to see a new take on some of the coolest cars in the world, especially one captures the vibrancy and personality of the races that make these cars come alive.

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