Archive for the ‘Games’ Category

Bingo

Posted: 28/11/2012 in Games
Tags: ,

20121128-120619.jpg

Bingo is played in halls. Bingo rules and payouts and play variations vary from place to place. Bingo brochures detailing particular games, rules and payouts are usually available at each respective location.
Basically, players buy cards with numbers on them in a 5 x 5 grid corresponding to the five letters in the word B-I-N-G-O. Numbers such as B-2 or 0-68 are then drawn at random (out of a possible 75 in American Bingo, and 90 in British and Australian Bingo) until one player completes a ‘Bingo’ pattern, such as a line with five numbers in a vertical, horizontal or diagonal row on one of their cards and wins the prize. There are many possible patterns to play for.
A bingo Card contains 24 numbered spaces and one free space (blank), with which you play BINGO. The numbers are assigned at random on each card and are arranged in five columns of five numbers each by five rows (5 x 5 = 25 in total including the blank square).
The numbers in the B column are between 1 and 15, in the I column between 16 and 30, in the N column (containing four numbers and the free space) between 31 and 45, in the G column between 46 and 60, and in the O column between 61 and 75.

Advertisements

Bao Game

Posted: 19/11/2012 in Games

Bao is a traditional mancala board game played in most of East Africa including KenyaTanzaniaComorosMalawi, as well as some areas of DR Congo and Burundi.[1][2][3] It is most popular among the Swahili people of Tanzania and Kenya; the name itself “Bao” is theSwahili word for “board” or “board game”. In Tanzania, and especially Zanzibar, a “bao master” (called bingwa, “master”; but also fundi, “artist”) is held in high respect. In Malawi, a close variant of the game is known as Bawo, which is the Yao equivalent of the Swahili name.[4]

View-Master

Posted: 19/11/2012 in Games

View-Master is the trademark name of a line of special-format stereoscopes and corresponding View-Master “reels”, which are thin cardboard disks containing seven stereoscopic 3-D pairs of small color photographs on film.[1]

The View-Master system was introduced in 1939, four years after the advent of Kodachrome color film made the use of small high-quality photographic color images practical. Tourist attraction and travel views predominated in View-Master’s early lists of available reels, most of which were meant to be interesting to users of all ages. Most current View-Master reels are intended for children.