Posts Tagged ‘retro’

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Love it ❤️.

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Two Vespa’s! Too cute!

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The best Vespa’s ever. Get inspired, always in vintage style. #vintage #industrial #vespa

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I’ve joint my target ….

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Rockin vespa.

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Black Vintage Vespa.

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Love the colors.

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It’s almost scooter time!

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Lego & Vespa. Vintage Combination.

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Dear Old Vespa #Retro Life.

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The best Vespa’s ever. Get inspired, always in vintage style. #vintage #industrial #vespa.

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Vespa Vintage 50 CC One of the symbols of Made in Italy. The first two-wheel scooter ever made, featuring the steel monocoque chassis, christened by Enrico Piaggio “Vespa” for its rounded shape.

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Apart from the very very nice vespa (n helmet) really really nice shoes. ❤️

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Vintage Vespa and Lambretta scooters in fab shades.

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From another view..

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Wow what a classic color for a #vespa #vespacolor

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Vespa 1967 Candy Apple Red VLB.

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Posted: 08/03/2014 in Tools
Tags: ,

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In 1922, Ferdinando Innocenti of Pescia built a steel-tubing factory in Rome. In 1931, he took the business to Milan where he built a larger factory producing seamless steel tubing and employing about 6,000. The factory was heavily bombed and destroyed during World War II. It is said that surveying the ruins, Innocenti saw the future of cheap, private transport and decided to produce a motor scooter, competing on cost and weather protection against the ubiquitous motorcycle.

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The main stimulus for the design style of the Lambretta and Vespa dates back to pre-World War II Cushman scooters made in Nebraska, United States. These olive green scooters were in Italy in large numbers, ordered originally by the United States military as field transport for the paratroops and marines. The United States military had used them to get around German defence tactics of destroying roads and bridges in the Dolomites (a section of the Alps) and the Austrian border areas.
Aeronautical engineer General Corradino D’Ascanio, responsible for the design and construction of the first modern helicopter by Agusta, was given the job by Ferdinando Innocenti of designing a simple, robust and affordable vehicle. It had to be easy to drive for both men and women, be able to carry a passenger and not get its driver’s clothes soiled.

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D’Ascanio, who hated motorbikes, designed a revolutionary vehicle. It was built on a spar frame with a handlebar gear change and the engine mounted directly onto the rear wheel. The front protection “shield” kept the rider dry and clean in comparison to the open front end on motorcycles. The pass-through leg area design was geared towards women, as wearing dresses or skirts made riding conventional motorcycles a challenge. The front fork, like an aircraft’s landing gear, allowed for easy wheel changing. The internal mesh transmission eliminated the standard motorcycle chain, a source of oil and dirt. This basic design allowed a series of features to be deployed on the frame which would later allow quick development of new models.
However, General D’Ascanio fell out with Innocenti, who rather than a stamped spar frame wanted to produce his frame from rolled tubing, allowing him to revive both parts of his prewar company. General D’Ascanio disassociated himself from Innocenti and took his design to Enrico Piaggio who produced the spar-framed Vespa from 1946 on. The final design of the Lambretta was done by aeronautical engineers Cesare Pallavicino and Pier Luigi Torre. Pallavicino had been Technical Director at the Caproni airplane factory during World War II before working on the Lambretta design. Torre was an engine designer at Italo Balbo’s Idros; he designed the engine and organized Innocenti’s factory for mass production.

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Wurlitzer.

A model 1015 jukebox of 1946.

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The ten-fifteen jukebox of 1946-47, was the most successful jukebox ever.
This is one of the classic designs of Paul Fuller, with it’s eight bubble tubes and amazing revolving coloured cylinders.

A model 1100 Jukebox of 1948.

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The last Wurlitzer Jukebox designed by their famous designer, Paul Fuller, complete with revolving cylinders, what more could you want ! Playing 24 selections on one side of 24 10″ 78s.

A Model 1700 Jukebox of 1954.

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The first Wurlitzer to use the “Carousel” changer Mechanism specially designed for forty-five rpm records and played 104 selections from both sides of 52 records.

A Model 1448 Jukebox of 1955.

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A Rock-Ola with all the right looks. Loads of chrome, stainless steel and aluminium. Great “clanking” mechanism with a great sound. Playing 120 selections on both sides of 60 45s.

A Model 1900 of 1956.

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This model was designed in late 1955 and produced in 1956 for the centenary of the company founded by Rudolph Wurlitzer in 1856.
One of the most collectable 50’s jukeboxes with a great sound system featuring two bass speakers, a midrange speaker and a tweeter.

A Model 1455 Jukebox of 1957.

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Here it is, the golden wonder of 1957. Sounds great too! Playing 200 selections on both sides of 100 45 rpm records.

A Model 1465 of 1958.

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The Rock-ola Model 1465 of 1958 is a rare 200 selection machine. Rock-ola only made 200 selection machines between 1957 and 1962, they found that this was too many selections for the punters and went back to 160 selections!

A Bal-AMI Model J-200M jukebox of 1959.

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In 1953 an Englishman Samuel Norman did a deal with the US Company AMI to supply and market/manufacture the American machines in the UK from his factory “Balfor Industries” in Ilford, Essex. These were known as Bal-Amis and here is a model “J” from 1959.
This machine has one of the best sound systems available in a Jukebox at this period.
It plays 200 selections from both sides of 100 forty-five rpm records.

A BAL-AMI Model K-200E of 1960.

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An amazing “beast” has wonderful sound, is very reliable and has loads of chrome!
Playing 200 selections on both sides of 100 45s.

An AMi Continental Jukebox for 1961.

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The Ami Continental, the new design for 1961 was advertised as:-
“A brilliant performer in the AMI tradition …… boldly designed to set a new standard of style. The silhouette is unmistakably distinctive … the lines clean and graceful … the illumination, soft and indirect, highlights the rich golden trim and soft subtle cabinet colors. The total effect is exciting … intriguing … dramatically compelling. Truly the style of to-morrow, for more play, today.”
This is a 200 selection version (on both sides of 100 45s) and has electric bush button play.

A Continental 2 jukebox of 1962.

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The Continental 2 of 1962 is the last Ami produced by the firm before it was taken over and is basically the last really original design produced for a jukebox.

Imme 1950 R100 98cc.

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Peugeot 1914 5hp 662cc.

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Chater Lea 1902 2hp 211cc.

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Rudge 1925 four valve four speed 350cc.

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Ducati 1960 200 Elite 200cc.

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Raleigh 1924 model 5 399cc.

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Harley Davidson 1921 21f 1000cc.

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Harley Davidson 1926 26B 350cc.

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Harley Davidson Pea Shooter.

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This first TV is a wonderful little 1939 HMV 904 with a 5 inch tube. the set was fished out of the rubbish pile at Exeter Recycling Centre a few years ago by one of the attendants. The TV screen had been covered up with paper (notice the rectangular sticky bits above and below the tube) and, presumably, the set had been used only as a radio.

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The next set is a 1947 Pye model B16T. These sets were produced from 1946 and were the first TV that people could buy after the war.

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This set is a 1949 Pye model LV20. It is a typical-of-the-age Pye 405 line TRF set. It uses a “Wedge” shaped chassis, loads of red Mullard EF50’s and a 9 inch Mullard tube.

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The next set is a 1948 Ekco 9″ model TS46. The cabinet looks as though somebody has tried to tart it up a bit with liberal applications of wood “stopping” filler and varnish.

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Next is a little 1949 Ekco 9″ model TS88. The tube emission is low, but it gives a very good picture, if a little dull. It’s best viewed in a darkened room.

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This set is a 1950 single channel Ambassador model TV2. The set is a very unusual shape and was designed to fit into the corner of a room.

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The next set is a 9″ Sobell T90 set.

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This is a 1950 Bush model TV22.

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Next is a 1953 Bush model TV24. The Bush TV24 was almost identical inside to the Bush TV22 (Above), although it had a bigger (12-inch) tube. When new, the TV24 was more expensive than the TV22, although now TV22s are very desirable and the poor old TV24s are not really worth anything…

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The set is a 1958 Ferguson 306.

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Next is a 1959 Philips 21-inch TV model 21TG100.

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This next set is a Pilot from the mid to late 1950s.

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This set is a 1966 HMV 2634 “Imp” and uses the Thorn 980 chassis, the last single-standard 405-line-only chassis. The set is identical in all but colour to the Marconi 4634 “Mini”, the Ferguson 3639 “Junior 12” and the Ultra 6641 “Cub”. The set works pretty well after a reasonable amount of work, although the scan coils are falling out of their enclosure causing the pincushion distortion shown in the picture.

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